“It’s called The Walk, The Walk….”

Greetings all,

Welcome to September and the last quarter of 2018. Time flies, yadda, yadda, yadda.

I’m a fan and user of the Apple Watch for fitness tracking and what Apple occasional does is create various badges and awards in its Activity tracking app to help users stay motivated to exercise. I’m also an admin of Facebook’s Apple Watch Fitness Fans Group and walking is one of the many workouts I log as an exercise in the app. On ! Sept, they issued the National Parks achievement for any user that walks or runs for a total of 50 mins, minimum, and logs it as a workout. I took them up on the challenge, got up early and went for said walk at 7 am that morning.

It was a cool morning, perfect for a walk during that time of day. It included an uphill walk (don’t know of the elevation got recorded by the watch and/or phone) part of the way, as well as through two paths that joined adjacent streets. The workout data as well as the achievement award, are shown below.

As I had just started the round trip, another walker on the other side of the street approached me. We gave each other the obligatory good morning wave, and kept stepping. What I noticed is, instead of treading on a perfectly constructed sidewalk (as I was doing), he chose to walk in the street. What I *never* understood is why people do this when a sidewalk is available.

Granted, I’ve seen a group of people do this, but I only think this happens because a sidewalk is too narrow to accomodate discussion between all involved, so to spread out by the curve in the street makes it easier for all to talk and hear each other, instead of pretty much walking in single file. I can’t see applying that logic to a single person walking.

I have come to one deductive reason, which may seem cockamamie but here goes: People who do this may have grown up in rural areas where sidewalks were not prevalent, only roads, so they are forced to do so and are used to it. I’d be interested in hearing your thoughts.

Thanks for the read.
Fresh!

PS: For you fans of the band, The Time, get the blog title 😉

References:
1. Apple Pay and Apple Watch help customers celebrate America’s national parks.

NP: Birds Of A Feather|Philanthrope

Farewell, FuelBand….it’s been a sheer pleasure.

Greetings all,
It’s Friday, 10:31PM EST to be exact, and I’m glad that the start of a long(er) weekend is here.

This post is about the end of a journey, a journey that began with the use of what became a fitness tracking device I became very fond of. While I won’t rehash all my feelings about it in this post, I’ll provide links to previous posts that you can read, should you be so inclined. The beginning of the end of the journey began on 20 April of this year. That is the day that Nike officially shutdown the Nike Plus website and pulled the Nike+ Connect app as well as the iOS NikeFuel and Moves App from the app store. The API was no longer available for quite sometime and the Nike Fuel Developer Site was also shut down. What this meant for users of the Fuel Band, Nike GPS Watch, and a number of other legacy Nike fitness tracking devices was that they were no longer able to sync their data or change any current user profile data to the Nike website. This also meant that once the device’s memory was full, it would essentially become useless. The day the announcement went up on Nike’s site, there was mixed emotions around the interwebs. Those emotions pretty much centered around two camps: 1) I haven’t used mine in YEARS/It broke, and 2) Being pretty much upset that Nike discontinued all support (even though they stopped selling it new years ago). With bearing much repeating, Nike and Apple eventually agreed to integrated NikeFuel into the four OS apps – Nike Fuel, Moves, Nike Run Club (NRC) , Nike Training Club (NTC). With April 30th arriving, Nike Fuel and Moves got the boot from the app store. Along with that, the Nike Training App ceased to generate NikeFuel points from their workouts (which I was not happy with – especially going back with the dolts at Nike Support who took about four Twitter messages to finally answer my question “Will the NTC app continue to track NikeFuel points because you didn’t make that clear in your website announcement).

That said, I was only able to track NikeFuel points via the NRC app…the issue there is…I’m not a regular runner, so that wasn’t going to me any good in tracking on a daily basis. As you’ll see from the previous posts below, I had already cobbled some math together that would allow me to “estimate” NikeFuel points derived from Apple Watch calories so this was going to be my way of tracking Fuel points once the Fuel Band ceased to work. I wore the Apple Watch and the Fuel together from 1 May to tonight (it’s still on my wrist). Since then, I became an admin in the Apple Watch Fitness Fans Group on Facebook, and continually posted my stats and photos of the band in that group.

Since since the website and apps were no longer available, I had to now log my daily Fuel points manually. Since I have a wee bit of knowledge in using Excel, I developed a spreadsheet to enter the daily goals into. I also created a graph that was a mild facsimile of the one used on the Nike Plus site. In a notes column, I entered anytime I logged Fuel points by using the NRC app, along with any workout exercises that added to my daily points.

This has been going since 1 May. Graphical data for the past four months. My Fuel Band user buddy, Hope asked me why I won’t continued until the band’s data is maxed out. I decided to only track dated for whole months. The band is giving me the “Memory Low -Sync Now” warning, which means it can be filled up anyday now, so I’ve decided to call it quits tonight, the last day of the month. Here’s what the data looks like since May 1.


Monthly Avg.: 2265
Exceeded Goal by: 67.7%


Monthly Avg.: 2299
Exceeded Goal by: 76.7%


Monthly Avg.: 22384
Exceeded Goal by: 77.4%


Monthly Avg.: 2142
Exceeded Goal by: 58.1%

And the grand total Nike Fuel Points earned (23 Sep 17 through 31 Aug 2018): 641,206

I spent the last week of July in Jamaica, came back in August and slacked off – hence the lower stats. LOL. nike has stated in its Fuel Band FAQ the band can go for about 30 to 45 days (max) without before the memory fills up and needs to sync with the website to empty the memory I believe I was able to extend that time frame because as of May 1st, my daily goal was only at 2000 points and the highest goal I reached in the past four months a little over 4000 (as seen above).

Well, tomorrow starts tracking Fuel points via the Apple Watch. I was fortunate enough to connect with a Sr. Data Scientist at Nike who worked on the Fuel band, who was kind enough to vet my math and provide some comments and suggest corrections for the conversion to be as accurate as possible, considering difference in accelerometer technology between the Apple Watch and the Fuel band. In addition, I was able to connect with some other employees that worked on Fuel band development, I was told that Nike had some discussion about releasing the Nike+ Connect (desktop) app as open source, but later found out that it is not on their list of priorities. There have been a few people who were able to establish bluetooth low energy (BLE) connectivity with the band and log certain types of data. There’s a software engineer I connect with on Twitter who has been working on doing the same in his spare time but, again, that is low priority.

On a whim last night, I decided to do one last Google search on the band, this time via Behance’s website. Behance is a portal for creators of illustration, photographic, animation, and product design content. To my surprise, I came across the work of Valentin Dequidt and his “recent” concept idea for a Nike Fuel Watch. Totally fell in love with what I saw. Here are two graphics of it.

For the entire concept, click on the link below.

NikeFuel Watch Concept – Valentin Dequidt

Well that’s it. It is officially Sept 1 (12:09 am). Goodbye Fuel Band 🙂 There never was and will never be another fitness tracker that will take the approach to fitness/activity tracking the way you did. The advertising Nike put into it’s ecosystem was phenomenal.

Nike Fuel Band "The Inside Story" from New North Sound on Vimeo.

It was a long post I know. I appreciate you taking the time to read it!

peace!
Fresh!

References:
1. The NikeFuel Band SE in 2017: Band On The Run
2. Apple Watch calories to NikeFuel Points: An experiment
3. Nike Discontinues NikeFuel Legacy Devices and Software

The Phone Zone – Lessons in Reduction

Greetings and good evening….

As is often said, “Where did the month go?” Three more days until we enter in the last quarter of 2018. It’s just after 9pm and it was a long day at work – two hour meeting followed by coming up to speed on various aspects of the current mission I’m working on, via a lot of reading. Top that off with the fact I should have gotten my tail in the bed earlier last night.

In any event, those of you that have been following my many blog posts this month, Darrenkeith and I have been on an accountability journey regarding this sabbatical we’ve both taken from Facebook, Instagram, and a few other social media sites (save Twitter), waxing philosophically as we go. As said earlier, what I thought (in the beginning) was spending too much time engaged in social media turned out that the result of that was the lack of putting my phone *away and out of sight*. I’m convinced now that is the crux of the issue – an issue that I’m glad became clear during this sabbatical. I’ve read and shared a few articles with you on the subject already and came across one that I shared with Darrenkeith this morning. It was interesting because it involved a handful of subjects who sought to deal with this particular issue in their own, separate ways. I’ll share a link to that article below. I’d be interested in reading your comments on the article. in addition, there is a podcast that I recently listened to that provides fantastic insight and balance on the exact topic of this blog post, it talks to considerations of persuasive technology.

Suffice it say, I’ve come up with a number things I plan to put in to play in hopes of dealing with the same, in a way that I hope to prove beneficial. That said, if I am a lot slower in getting back to you via text, Messenger, Twitter DM, and the like, as Jermaine Jackson sang “Don’t Take It Personal….” (it truly isn’t)… just attempting to return to a time, long, long, ago (LOL) of less distraction from mobile device-ism, less “device dopamine hits” and more movements towards being in a “tech-less” moment and goals achieving state.

In a few days, I’ll reactivate my FB account and deactivate my personal Instagram account but keep two music production Instagram sites for branding purpose – the only difference this time is that neither FB or IG apps will be back on my phone. All (what I continue to be) my best photos will be seen from my Flickr account from here on out. The pleasure of blogging from my own “theater” has returned this month, so be on the lookout for this relationship:

content creation > content consumption
(where content = blogposts/music/podcasts/photography/code/film score music and video)

Come 1 Sept, the rubber (of the sabbatical) meets the road (of reality) – let’s see what sticks after a month off.

Thanks for bearing with me….

:::oceans of rhythm:::

Fresh!

References:
1. Tech Titans Dish Advice About Phone Addiction – Great Escape – Medium
2. This World My Life – Darrenkeith
3. “Persuasive Technology” from Let’s Know Things – A podcast about context and the news.

NP: Lovely Standards/Amel Larriuex

Nothing in particular, on a Sunday night.

Sunday night again. The weekend was good, but too short as usual. Feeling a little melancholy, though. Another tragic shooting in Jacksonville today 🙁 . I saw a tweet (and not the first reference to such) from a native of the UK frowning upon America’s lack of gun control and similar, compared to that in the UK and why they don’t suffer such tragedies. I’m sure the debate can go on and on and on and…but from my vantage point, the question is valid. I just hope that these shootings…just…stop….
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Seriously….stop.

Good night.

Social Media Sabbatical (SMS): Day 23 – 23 Aug 18 – Using less social media – Pt. 3

Greetings all…

Long work week, but the good thing is one more day left, until a two-day break from it all. So, as those who have been keeping up know, I have eight more days until this FB/Instagram/Reddit/etc social media break OFFICIALLY ends. One major thing I have learned up to now is that it turns out it wasn’t just the social media scrolling that I thought was the issue. What I believe the truer issue is…constantly having the phone in my hand which leads to said scrolling every time I subconsciously needed that “dopamine hit”.

I came across an interesting article a few days ago that I purposely saved for this blog post – one that I find totally ironic. The title of the article is

Use the New Tools in iOS 12 and Android 9 Pie to Fight Your Phone Addiction.

I think you may be able to understand why I find this ironic. I do get it, in that the said features in both operating systems are supposed to make you aware of how much time your spending surfing, scrolling, clicking, and the like, in hopes that, in time, you will spend less time doing it. Thing is, the very thing it is trying to get you to do…involves the same tool you are trying to get away from.

For me, I have no interest in the tools. What I do have an interest for is continuing what I have attempted over the last week and that is just to “put the phone down”. Foundationally, it’s that simple…no?

My mom is staying with us for sometime, I sat down to eat dinner after I came home from work today and (this is a perfect example) pulled out my phone to check my Twitter feed while my plate was in front of me. In true “nother mode” she says…”Can’t you eat without your phone in your hand?” She was timely (as usual), but this time…so very, very correct.

That has been my biggest insight out of this sabbatical…admitting that I subconsciously had some form of FOMO, something I always said I didn’t have. Realizing and admitting it’s something to be dealt with, I’m up for overcoming the challenge.

Thoughts?

Thanks for the read…

peace,
Fresh!

Back to a passion – Amateur Photography – Nikon D3100

Yesterday, after doing some research for some time, I purchased a Nikon D3100 DSLR with an 18-55mm, 55-200 mm zoom lens, battery, lens hood, and other accessories for $200 off Craigslist from an amateur photographer who has since upgraded is DSLR. The D3100 debuted 18 years ago as a 14.2-megapixel DX format DSLR Nikon F-mount camera replacing the D3000 as Nikon’s entry level DSLR. I never owned a DSLR before, but I taught myself how to shoot, develop, and print B&W film back in the 1989 – 1994 timeframe, using a Minolta XG-7 SLR. During that time, I purchased everything I needed to go from shooting to print. Outside of the enlarger, I think I still have many of the developer accessories. My favorite B&W film that I shot were Kodak Tri-X plan for general shots, and Plus-X Pan for higher ISO prints, as well as some of the Ilford B&W films. For color, the basic Kodak ISOs (Gold) and some of the Fuji film. In addition, I shot slide film also, primarily Kodachrome 25, 64, and 400.

That time frame of learning really solidified my interest in photography to the point where I started, with a close friend of mine, a small photography business called VisionQuest Photography. Lotsa fun, shooting all over DC, shooting wannabe models, etc.

From there in the mid-90s, I graduated to (and still have) a Nikon N60, with two lenses. Took a ton of great pics with that too, and uploaded many photos to my Flickr account, but then the passion died off a bit. Enter the mobile phone and the advent of mobile phone photography technology. Fast forward to the emergence of Instagram – we all now that is all about uploading your phone pics. I currently own an iPhone 7 which takes fantastic pics and I currently have about 3500 photos in my personal IG account.

After years of using Instagram and rarely using my N60, I slowly (as of recently) began to miss SLR photography. A few of you may have read my previous post regarding Flickr vs Instagram, so you know that I am heading back to posting what I consider my more serious side of photography to my new Flickr account, which will take the place of my soon-to-be deleted personal Instagram account. I hope you’ll enjoy the resurgence of my photography there. In there near future, after I come up to speed with the D3100, I’ll be blogging about the photos with links to my Flickr gallery. This camera, I’m sure, will get the job done nicely.

Way past my bedtime….

Thanks for the read!
Fresh.

Social Media Sabbatical (SMS): Day 20 – 20 Aug 18 – Using less social media – Pt. 2

Another workday Monday has come and gone. It was productive, tedious but productive. This morning, the usual diatribe occurred between me and my brother in podcasting/tech/photographer/music, DarrenKeith regarding our social media use, or lack thereof. The discussion was briefly about plans of usage when returning back to FB and IG after this break is over. Strangely enough, I stumbled across this Twitter post and thread today:

The OP stated essentially the same thoughts I’ve been having regarding my return to Instagram. The only thing different between her and I is that she has a successful business that she’s been using FB and IG to promote. Me, all I have are two secondary IG counts used for branding my music production activities as a personal artist and one half of AfterSix Productions.

Reading the thread further solidfied my thoughts about deleting my personal IG account. Only two IG followers reached out to me since 1 August to ask about what happened to my IG account (there are 5 followers total whom I let know ahead of time that the sabbatical was going to take place). As of this writing, I’ve already requested IG send me a download link to retrieve all my content. That site will be deleted no later than 31 August 2018 at 11:59pm. The other two IG accounts will remain. As for FB, I’m considering what I will do once I returned regarding how much time I will actually engage there. Twitter will remain, as it provides a relatively high ROI. Flickr will become my platform for photosharing.

Well, studies say that it typically takes 21 days to form a habit. Tomorrow marks the 21st day of sabbatical from both FB and IG. We’ll see how valid, IRL, those studies are…

Peace and blessings,
Fresh!

Social Media Sabbatical (SMS): Day 18 – 18 Aug 18 – Using less social media (?)

Greetings readers…

Eighteen days in of disengagement from Facebook and Instagram. I’m starting to think about, increasingly, my reasons (and associated ROI) for returning to Facebook. I’ve not had the desire to even check it at all, so there is where I am right now. There are two groups I am an active admin in, which are both low maintenance, so my reasoning for returning (or not) is based on that fact. None of my co-admins have contacted me about an issues going on so….

Now, my brother-in-tech/podcasting/photography/music, DarrenKeith, sent me a very on-point article from one of my favorite radio shows, Marketplace from American Public Media. This article and podcast is entitled Americans, including tech insiders, are using less social media. Suffice it to say, the gist of the article actually said things I’ve heard in passing over the last six months, but I did learn some interesting things from it. One was the aspect of flat out quitting social media vs limiting your use of it (the same commentary was something discussed in a Twitter thread with one of my followers, Brian Tramuel, which started from an article he posted and I referenced in my own blog post that evening.

If you’re so inclined, let me know what you think of the Marketplace article. Some of the commentary definitely has me continuing to solidify my approach to using social media, whenever I return.

Have a great day/evening/night

Fresh!

#100DaysOfCode – Goal Setting (You must crawl before you can walk)

Greetings all….

Some of you know I’ve been participating in the #100DaysOfCode campaign from some of the previous posts on this blog. I’m learning to code in Python, and though this is the third attempt over the last few years, this campaign, as well as a totally different outlook than before, has allowed me to travel further along than the last two attempts. The accountability (if you will) to this Twitter-based campaign has worked well, broadened my network of those striving to do the same, and has provided a good dose of regular motivation. That’s all well and fine, but after 23 days in, and coming across a few articles, I’m realizing what I am missing (which is not specifically campaign related). What missing is the long term goal.

I listened to a podcast two weeks ago that REALLY walked down my street. In short, it’s the story about a current developer who is a little older than me, but the key, common characteristic is age – and how many figure that at a certain age, it’s too late to accomplish certain things. After listening to it, it provided (and still does) great motivation to debunk that attitude. If your interested, you can listen (or read the transcript): I’m 56 and learning to code. Here’s an epic beat-down of my critical inner self.

That said, I’ve decided to step back and provide some answers to some unknown questions. The journey to accomplishment involves sequence that I actually heard a developer talk about in a podcast two weeks ago that really hit hone with me. That led me to the questions in my outline, which look like this:

The Sequence
1. Goal Setting
2. Hard Work
3. Pain
4. Enjoyment
5. Goal Accomplished

The Questions
Q1 – What’s the motivation for me to learn Python (or any other coding language)?
A1 – The mptivation is to learn Python is that its specialty includes scientific computing. I want to be able to apply scientific computing to help solve problems I may have the opportunity to in my career at some point. Secondly it is to master a language that I could use in a career change or consulting scenario. Thirdly, it is to be the base coding language for supporting technical hobbies like Arduino project development

Q2 – What short and long term goals I hope to achieve?
A2a – Short Term: To become proficient enough where I can code programs to solve a variety of problems, contribute to open source projects and develop websites using the Flask frameoork (or similar framework that I finally decide will be most beneficial). To learn to apply the well know scientific computing libraries to help in coding well written programs.

A2b – Long Term: Provide services to those in need, do some form of consulting. Increase regular contributions to open-source projects

Q3 – What methods/activities do I plan to execute to in order to achieve the goals?
A3 –

Q4 – How do I plan to execute self-management (in order to most efficiently use the time available to me) to apply the methods and activities?
A4 –

The third and fourth questions may appear simple to answer but it’s the execution that I really need to make sure is realistic. So, here I am. It’s Saturday night, and I will get to some coding after I publish this, but will take the rest of the weekend to make sure I answer the questions. This really needs to get done, because doing tutorials, learning, and even working on my current coding project is fine, but without a realistic and tangible end in sight, I may not be taking the best approach.

We all want to arrive at the destination, but we want to make it the trip efficient and positive (despite roadblocks, detours, setbacks, etc). I strive to, though I may not always achieve, “work smarter and not harder”

Thanks for the read….

Fresh.